Pastrami

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Pastrami

Postby Lord_Byron » Mon Dec 05, 2016 11:52 am

I made a pastrami over the weekend for the first time.

Started out with a 4.5 lb brisket flat, trimmed the fat down to about 1/8 inch and dry cured for 4 days with Morton Tender Quick, brown sugar, coriander and pepper. Rinsed and soaked, rubbed with cracked pepper, garlic powder and coriander seed and then smoked low for about 4 hours to 170 degrees. It came out great.

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Re: Pastrami

Postby Schadenfreude » Mon Dec 05, 2016 12:07 pm

Wow. That's impressive. A whole new level from barbecue.
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Re: Pastrami

Postby bgbill » Mon Dec 05, 2016 12:35 pm

Mouth watering. I need a sammich.
All is for the best in this best of all possible worlds.
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Re: Pastrami

Postby hammb » Mon Dec 05, 2016 12:40 pm

Nicely done Lord!

I LOVE pastrami, most specifically of the homemade variety. I have never done it with a dry cure though, it's always been a wet cure.

Like all things brisket I prefer the point to the fat. IT makes amazing pastrami. I typically cure a brisket for St. Paddy's day. Last year after curing I put the point on the smoker for pastrami.

Did you cook completely on the smoker or did you steam as well? I've found I really like the classic method of smoking it real low temp for flavor, but then giving it some steam to finish up the cooking.

Man, I am craving some brisket. The smokers are already stowed away in the garage for the winter (and I already pulled the stick burner out to smoke some turkey breasts for sandwich meat), but I may need to pull it back out again to do a brisket for the winter. I know most of the die hard BBQ guys "cook all year round!" but I really just don't enjoy the process in the winter. I hate cold, and tending the fire (or fighting charcoal in the WSM) to stay hot enough to cook in winter temps is NOT enjoyable to me. But damn am I gonna miss the food if I cannot have brisket (and I don't already have any in the freezer).
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Re: Pastrami

Postby Lord_Byron » Mon Dec 05, 2016 1:27 pm

I couldn't just buy a point and didn't feel like getting a whole packer, so I just went with the flat. We have a nose-to-tail butcher in town that sells dry aged beef. Talking to him, he said to use navel for pastrami, but I didn't want to pay the price to him for my first shot. I will the next time.

I smoked the whole way, refrigerated overnight, and then sliced and steamed prior to serving. Very happy with the results.

I smoke year round. I had an 8 x 12 bbq shed built in my back yard. Basically a pergola with a galvanized roof. I set up a hanging tool-box on the wall for all my implements. Have a stainless restaurant work table. It's got electricity and lights so when I'm out at night throwing on something for an all-day session, I don't have to fart around with flashlights and crap. I store my charcoal in the garage to keep it dry. Everything else is handy in the shed. I'll post a pic sometime.
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Re: Pastrami

Postby hammb » Mon Dec 05, 2016 1:31 pm

Nice. Would love to see that!

I continue living in my "starter home" which has been my starter home for 10+ years now. And we continue to talk about one day moving to a "forever home" yet have never actually taken that leap...

The result of this line of thinking is it prevents those sorts of long term improvements being made. At least some thing like that which would be a niche upgrade. Kitchen, windows, etc? Sure, they're going to look nicer when it comes time to sell as well. But haven't gotten around to a dedicated outdoor cooking area.

My "forever home" will have such an area. Preferably with a brick wood pizza oven as well.
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